Despite its popularity, the show Dance Moms has not exactly done wonders for the world of dance schools! This reality tv program suggests learning to dance involves a lot of catfights and mean-girl behaviour.

At our studio, the vibe is anything but mean-spirited or catty. We aim to promote a positive, welcoming environment which motivates children to do their best and have a great time.

To put your mind at rest about dance studios and learning to dance, here are some myths busted, from the show and in general.

Myth #1: Dance teachers are mean

This is so far from the truth. Many high-level dance teachers will push hard to help their students achieve the best but even this doesn’t equate to meanness’s. The stereotype of the dance teacher belittling her students is cruel and wrong. Most dance teachers, especially for younger children and adults just starting out, are lovely people. They are passionate about dance and want to share their love for this beautiful art form.

Myth #2 Dance mums are pushy

We all know about the typical “stage mum”, and they do exist in all types of performance and sporting activities. Most parents, however, are just like you, caring and loving. Their main motivation is for their child to have fun while learning a skill, not to be the star of every show.

Myth #3 Kids who dance don’t do anything else

Often, kids who enjoy dancing are involved in plenty of other activities. Even for those truly obsessed with dance, learning gymnastics and swimming and musical instruments are all beneficial practices. It would be very rare to find a child whose only extracurricular activity is dance, and learning to dance does not require so much commitment that other lessons are out of the question.

The only pressure you may find for your child to focus solely on their dance lessons is in the leadup to a performance, exam or competition, when extra rehearsals may be scheduled to allow them to be adequately prepared.

Myth #4 Dancers spend every weekend at competitions

In the show Dance Moms, the students are bussed to competitions almost every weekend. It looks exhausting, and we’re sure it is!

As stated earlier, not all dance lessons or dance schools are created with winning competitions in mind. Most of the time, competitions are optional and are not required as part of class attendance. Instead of weekly competitions, it is more often the case that competitions are held a few times a year. If children want to prepare and enter a routine, they can.

Myth #5 Dancers don’t eat

If dancers don’t eat, they won’t be fit and strong. Dancing requires strength and fitness. It is more often the case that a dance school becomes concerned because a student is underweight rather than overweight.

Our studio encourages good health and nutrition, which means eating a nutrient-rich, balanced diet. We want students to be well-fed so they have the energy they need for their lessons.

Myth #6 Dancers are horrible to each other

As with any competitive industry, tensions may evolve at times but to say dancers treat each other badly is a clear untruth. In fact, many dancers will do most of their work in an ensemble. When working closely with a small group of people it does not pay to be mean!

Far from being enemies, companies and dance troupes are often like close-knit families. Children who learn to dance together form strong friendships which often last for life.

Myth #7 You have to be skinny to dance

If there is any myth that is more malicious than the others, it is this one. Dance is often perceived as an elite art form but all people have danced since the dawn of time. If you are passionate and willing to work hard, you can dance.

The last thing any dance teacher wants is a student who believes they can’t dance because of their size. Dance is about passion, rhythm and fun and it is for absolutely everyone.

Skinny or not, if you want to, you should dance!

Ready to get started? Book your Trial class today.

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